[vc_row][vc_column][dfd_spacer screen_wide_resolution=”1280″ screen_wide_spacer_size=”50″ screen_normal_resolution=”1024″ screen_tablet_resolution=”800″ screen_mobile_resolution=”480″][dfd_heading style=”style_05″ title_font_options=”tag:h4″ subtitle_font_options=”tag:h3″]The final straw for plastic? Let’s nip this in the bud.[/dfd_heading][dfd_spacer screen_wide_resolution=”1280″ screen_wide_spacer_size=”30″ screen_normal_resolution=”1024″ screen_tablet_resolution=”800″ screen_mobile_resolution=”480″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”2/3″][dfd_spacer screen_wide_resolution=”1280″ screen_wide_spacer_size=”20″ screen_normal_resolution=”1024″ screen_tablet_resolution=”800″ screen_mobile_resolution=”480″][vc_column_text]Plastic continues to be a hot topic when it comes to our environment, mainly when it comes to commercial goods sold to the public. Plastic straws and cotton buds are the latest to come under the spot light, and rightly so we believe. Without the full cooperation of the masses, it becomes almost impossible to regulate and ensure these items are disposed of correctly. Most of us (I hope) recycle at home, but when was the last time you recycled the plastic on your McDonald’s milkshake cup? The truth is that most of the time it ends up in the bin, or if you are a toe rag (which the UK is full of), on the floor or in the canal.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1053″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”1056″ alignment=”center”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”3/4″][vc_column_text]

Since this issue became a mainstream concern, there has been a huge amount of development into ‘Bio-polymers’ and ‘Bio-degradable’ polymers. These are viewed by some as the ideal solution to tackle the issues. Well, if it bio-degrades then it doesn’t matter if it ends up on the floor, or on the beach, or in the sea, right? Wrong.

Many of these ‘bio’ materials do not start to degrade until they are in suitable environments, some of which require certain temperatures which are not achieved when floating in the Atlantic! Therefore, the EU is looking to ban certain products manufactured in plastic, because the issue is not realistically avoided any other way.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][dfd_spacer screen_wide_resolution=”1280″ screen_wide_spacer_size=”50″ screen_normal_resolution=”1024″ screen_tablet_resolution=”800″ screen_mobile_resolution=”480″][dfd_heading style=”style_05″ title_font_options=”tag:h4″ subtitle_font_options=”tag:h3″]How does this effect PQ’s product range?[/dfd_heading][dfd_spacer screen_wide_resolution=”1280″ screen_wide_spacer_size=”50″ screen_normal_resolution=”1024″ screen_tablet_resolution=”800″ screen_mobile_resolution=”480″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text css_animation=”fadeIn”]

Plastic products are not automatically a bad thing when used in the correct applications. In fact, it is on the contrary, because they can be recycled and reprocessed into a new component. The lighting industry is a prime example of how plastics can be used and recycled responsibly. The WEEE initiative, for example, ensures that plastic components are responsibly processed and do not cause an issue for our environment.

It is important therefore to differentiate between components which deservedly receive bad press and ones which have a responsible full life cycle.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1062″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”1066″ alignment=”center”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”3/4″][vc_column_text css_animation=”fadeIn”]Here at PQ, we are always looking for new materials to see if these will provide an added advantage for our customers, and biopolymers are no different. Currently, we have not sourced a bio-material which meets our strict technical specifications and that would allow us to supply at a competitive price. With the lighting industry being at the forefront of recycling, we are comforted knowing the products we supply are being disposed of in an ethical manner. Another concern we have with bio-materials is the ability for the end user/processor to determine the type of plastic which is being used in order for it to be correctly recycled. A trip to your local tip will highlight what happens to items which fall into any sort of grey area – they end up in landfill.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][dfd_spacer screen_wide_resolution=”1280″ screen_wide_spacer_size=”50″ screen_normal_resolution=”1024″ screen_tablet_resolution=”800″ screen_mobile_resolution=”480″][dfd_heading style=”style_05″ title_font_options=”tag:h5″ subtitle_font_options=”tag:h3″]What is PQ doing to help the environment?[/dfd_heading][dfd_spacer screen_wide_resolution=”1280″ screen_wide_spacer_size=”50″ screen_normal_resolution=”1024″ screen_tablet_resolution=”800″ screen_mobile_resolution=”480″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”1069″ alignment=”right”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”3/4″][vc_column_text]

At the start of 2018, we changed our refuse partners which means we are now able to recycle 100% of our waste when manufacturing our in-house bulkheads. We have also taken pro-active measures to ensure all our packaging is recyclable and we have eliminated the use of polystyrene in-house, excluding the few items we currently import. By 2019, our ultimate aim is being a carbon neutral company.

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